Episode 101: Joshua

May 27, 2022 00:57:13
Episode 101: Joshua
Latter-day Peace Studies presents: Come, Follow Me
Episode 101: Joshua
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Show Notes

The Book of Joshua recounts the Israelites’ story of their conquest of Canaan. The Israelites are tasked with creating a sacred space for God’s presence. Ben and Christopher discuss the perennial question of Divine Genocide as presented in the text. How does the rhetoric of the text match up with actual known history? If the Israelites didn’t actually kill the Canaanites en masse, then why does the text say they did? What does the Book of Joshua have to say to modern peace-loving Christians?

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