Episode 97: Exodus 21-34

April 29, 2022 01:15:22
Episode 97: Exodus 21-34
Latter-day Peace Studies presents: Come, Follow Me
Episode 97: Exodus 21-34
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Show Notes

Ben and Christopher discuss the laws put forth in the Book of the Covenant. These laws have an Ancient Near Eastern context mirrored in contemporary legal codes in the same context. The general exceptions are in how they treat the disadvantaged of society. Nephi’s killing of Laban finds its justification in these verses. The LORD gives instruction on how to construct the tabernacle, being a representation of the cosmos in creation and Eden. Moses wins an argument with God after the people worship before a golden calf. What are we to understand about God and His relationship with the people from this event?

Episode Transcript

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