Episode 88: Gen 18 - 23

February 23, 2022 01:23:27
Episode 88: Gen 18 - 23
Latter-day Peace Studies presents: Come, Follow Me
Episode 88: Gen 18 - 23
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Show Notes

The story of Abraham continues with the narrative of Lot and the destruction of Sodom. The ambiguity of the characters and conversations makes interpreting events difficult. Abraham models appropriate hospitality while Lot imitates it. Ben offers a potential historical reading of the Sodom account that might help explain the strange sequence of events. What was the explicit sin of Sodom as opposed to the traditional view? Did God really command Abraham to sacrifice his son? Christopher brings in additional versions of the story from other traditions. Studying these additional versions and the story of Abraham in The Pearl of Great Price opens up a new interpretation. Might we be reading both too much and too little into this story?

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